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How to Hard Boil Guinea Eggs | Learn how to hard boil guinea fowl eggs. I've tested a variety of cook times to yield the perfect hard boiled guinea egg. No green ring and no sulfur smell! | eatsomethingdelicious.com

How to Hard Boil Guinea Eggs

  • Author: Meagan Fikes
  • Prep Time: 1 min
  • Cook Time: 10 mins
  • Total Time: 11 minutes
  • Yield: 12 eggs

Description

Learn how to hard boil guinea fowl eggs. I’ve tested a variety of cook times to yield the perfect hard boiled guinea egg. No green ring and no sulfur smell!


Ingredients

  • 1 dozen guinea eggs (or however many you would like to cook)
  • water
  • ice cubes

Instructions

  1. Place the eggs in a pot and add just enough cold tap water to barely cover the eggs. Be sure the eggs are in a single layer, otherwise you may need a bigger pot or need to work in batches.
  2. Put a lid on the pot and bring to a boil over high heat.
  3. As soon as the water reaches a boil, immediately remove the pot from the heat and allow to sit for about 3-6 minutes depending on how fully cooked you prefer the yolk (I recommend 4-5 minutes. See photos and recipe notes). Once the time has elapsed, use a slotted spoon to move the eggs to an ice bath to stop the cooking process. The idea is to cool these as quickly as possible so if the ice melts and the eggs are still warm, add additional ice to the water until the eggs completely cool.
  4. Once cooled, you can peel and enjoy them right away or store them in the refrigerator for later.

Notes

  • A few notes on cooking times: 3 minutes yields a slightly cooked yolk but it is mostly runny. 4 minutes yields a very soft yolk with a slightly runny middle. 5 minutes is perfectly hardboiled but if you like it slightly softer, you can try 4 1/2 minutes. 6 minutes is fully cooked with the outside of the yolk beginning to get a bit crumbly. I’d recommend staying under 6 minutes and setting a timer since only a minute off can make a huge difference as you can see from the photos.
  • Egg sizes: The size of your eggs can also affect the cooking time. I’d estimate that these were slightly smaller than medium chicken eggs. If yours are larger, increase the cooking time. If smaller, decrease the time. Don’t be afraid to experiment with a few eggs to find what you like!