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Allen's Tire Birthday Cake | Learn how to decorate a cake using only gluten free ingredients. I made this vanilla cake decorated in a tire tread pattern for my son's first birthday. | eatsomethingdelicious.com

Allen’s Tire Birthday Cake

  • Author: Meagan Fikes
  • Prep Time: 8 hours
  • Cook Time: 1 hour
  • Total Time: 9 hours
  • Yield: 22 servings
  • Method: baking

Description

Learn how to decorate a cake using only gluten free ingredients. I made this vanilla cake decorated in a tire tread pattern for my son’s first birthday.


Ingredients

*Please see notes section at bottom of recipe first*

Special equipment needed:


Instructions

  1. It’s recommended to let the fondant sit overnight so make the fondant (dyed with the black food coloring) the night before you make your cake, if possible. If you like, you can also bake the cakes ahead of time so they have time to completely cool (see next steps).
  2. Preheat oven to required temperature as indicated on your packages of cake mix (325ºF for Bob’s Red Mill brand).
  3. Use shortening (or butter substitute if you prefer) to heavily grease the two 8 inch round cake pans – you’ll want to make sure there are no bare spots. Add about a tablespoon of gluten free flour to each pan and completely coat the greased surface with the flour by rotating and tapping the pan. Feel free to add extra flour if needed – any excess flour can be dumped out or saved for the next batch of cake. Just make sure there are no large clumps of flour, especially in the edges of the pan that would create dents in the cake. Set aside.
  4. Follow instructions on the package to prepare the first cake mix batter (I just did one package at a time). For the Bob’s Red Mill cake mix, you’ll want to reference the “white cake variation” instructions. Divide this first batch evenly between the two cake pans. Bake according to package directions.
  5. As soon as the first batch of cake comes out of the oven, move the pans to a cooling rack and set a timer for 15 minutes. While the cakes are cooling in the pans, prepare the next package of cake mix and set the batter aside.
  6. Once the 15 minute timer elapses, gently jiggle the cake pans until the cake moves around freely. At this point, you can flip them out of the pan and onto the cooling rack without the cake breaking. Wash and dry the cake pans and prep again as you did in step 3. Repeat the same process to bake, cool, and remove the cake from the pans.
  7. While the cakes cool the rest of the way, you can make the icing needed for the crumb coat and piping work. In a stand mixer with a paddle attachment, cream together 1 3/4 C of the shortening, 1/4 C of the water, and vanilla. Slowly add the powdered sugar and continue to beat. (It should be stiff.) Transfer to an airtight container and cover the top with a layer of plastic wrap before covering with a lid. You don’t want any air between the plastic wrap and the icing. Set aside.
  8. Once the cakes have cooled completely, use a bread knife to level them off. You’ll want to make sure the surface is flat then use a basting brush to brush away any loose crumbs.
  9. If you’re wrapping the cake board in any sort of decorative foil, do that now (I chose not to do this). Place the cake board centered on the lazy susan and smear a small dollop of the piping icing you made onto the middle of the cake board. Place one of your four cake layers in the middle of the cake board so it’s secured by the icing smear.
  10. Spread a thick layer of frosting (the store-bought stuff, not the icing you made) on top of this layer and use the angled spatula to spread it evenly. You can use a piping bag to dispense the frosting if it’s easier for you. Top with the next layer and repeat until you get to the top (the top won’t need frosting over it). When you get to the very top layer, I recommend placing it leveled side down so you get the clean edges from the cake pan on top. Use the remaining frosting to fill in any gaps between the layers so you have one solid stack of cake (this is where a piping bag is helpful).
  11. Get out the icing you made and if it’s been setting a while, you can whip it in a stand mixer to make it easier to spread. Spread a thin layer of this over the outside of the cake. Note that this layer isn’t for frosting the cake, it’s just to contain any loose crumbs and to allow the fondant to adhere to the cake. Too thick of a layer can cause the fondant to soften and break. After icing, make sure your cake is still stacked nicely before proceeding. Set the cake aside and store the remaining icing as you did before with plastic wrap and an airtight container.Allen's Tire Birthday Cake | Learn how to decorate a cake using only gluten free ingredients. I made this vanilla cake decorated in a tire tread pattern for my son's first birthday. | eatsomethingdelicious.com
  12. Clean a large, smooth work surface very well since this is where you’ll roll out your fondant. You can use a countertop or a fondant mat. Set out a bowl with plenty of shortening in it. Grease your cleaned work surface, fondant rolling pin, and hands (sorry) with the shortening. Knead your fondant until it is pliable and roll it out into a circle large enough to fully cover your cake. Use the shortening in the bowl to re-grease anything, as needed. If your fondant gets cracks, holes, or wrinkles, just knead it and roll it out again! You may need to add more powdered sugar if you roll it out too many times because it will absorb a lot of the shortening and become too wet.
  13. The easiest way to get the fondant onto the cake is to lift up one end and start gently wrapping it around the rolling pin until the entire circle has been wrapped up. Starting at the base of your cake, slowly unroll the fondant up and over the top then back down the other side until it is covered. Grease the fondant smoother with the shortening and gently coax the fondant to lay flat against every surface of the cake, down to the base. Once you work your way down to the base, use a fondant cutter or knife to cut away the excess fondant (save this excess for the next step!). Use a damp paper towel or cotton swabs to clean the exposed area of the cake board. *Tip: If you develop small cracks in the fondant after it’s already on the cake, paint in the area with some of the black food coloring.*Allen's Tire Birthday Cake | Learn how to decorate a cake using only gluten free ingredients. I made this vanilla cake decorated in a tire tread pattern for my son's first birthday. | eatsomethingdelicious.com
  14. Knead the excess fondant and roll it out again. Use a fondant cutter or plastic knife (if you rolled the fondant directly on your countertop, be sure to use something that won’t scratch) to cut into tire tread shapes as seen in the finished product photos. Each shape should be about the height of one layer of cake so you get four layers of “tread”. Follow the pattern in the photos to place each shape onto the cake. They should stick without needing to add anything.Allen's Tire Birthday Cake | Learn how to decorate a cake using only gluten free ingredients. I made this vanilla cake decorated in a tire tread pattern for my son's first birthday. | eatsomethingdelicious.com
  15. On your printer paper, draw or print a large block lettering style number (the person’s age!). Make sure it will fit on the top of your cake and use scissors to cut it out as nicely as you can. Place this on the top of the cake and use a butterknife or something similar to gently trace around the paper number so you get a shallow indention in the fondant then remove the paper.Allen's Tire Birthday Cake | Learn how to decorate a cake using only gluten free ingredients. I made this vanilla cake decorated in a tire tread pattern for my son's first birthday. | eatsomethingdelicious.com
  16. Take a small portion of your piping icing (not much, it’s just to make the yellow lines on the road!) and stir in some yellow food coloring until you get a dark yellow color similar to road markings. Use a piping bag and Wilton tip #2 to pipe road lines along the middle of the number. I just did a single dashed yellow line but you could do double lines or solid lines if you wish. Tip: practice on the paper number to see what looks best to you.
  17. Mix green food coloring into the remainder of your piping icing until it reaches the shade you’d like for the grass. Put this in a clean piping bag with the Wilton tip #233. Pipe grass all over the top of the cake, staying outside the number you outlined.Allen's Tire Birthday Cake | Learn how to decorate a cake using only gluten free ingredients. I made this vanilla cake decorated in a tire tread pattern for my son's first birthday. | eatsomethingdelicious.com
  18. You can also pipe grass around the base of the cake if you like. You could do just a few tufts of grass sticking out from under the tire or pipe to cover up the cake board like I did. It’s whatever you think looks best. Here’s what it looks like without the grass at the base:Allen's Tire Birthday Cake | Learn how to decorate a cake using only gluten free ingredients. I made this vanilla cake decorated in a tire tread pattern for my son's first birthday. | eatsomethingdelicious.com
  19. Finally select spots to place the one or two toy cars and candle(s) and you’re finished! (Finally!)Allen's Tire Birthday Cake | Learn how to decorate a cake using only gluten free ingredients. I made this vanilla cake decorated in a tire tread pattern for my son's first birthday. | eatsomethingdelicious.com

Notes

I’ve linked to many of the products I used for this recipe which worked for me (severely gluten intolerant and mild dairy allergy) but if you have food allergies/intolerances or are cooking for someone who does, please thoroughly research the ingredients you buy and follow safe practices to prevent the cross contamination of any problematic allergens while cooking.

Even if you own four of those 8 inch round cake pans, you don’t want to put four pans in the oven at the same time unless they all fit on the same rack. If you have some on the top rack and some on the bottom, they won’t bake correctly.